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Top 6 Thanksgiving Day Injuries!!! OUCH!

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HAPPY THANKSGIVING from 123 CPR, to YOU! Our instructors are made up of nurses, moms, surgical technicians, and medical assistants – we have seen our share of Thanksgiving Day injuries! Read below to know how to quickly prevent and/or treat these holiday pains!! Also, REGISTER HERE to take a class and learn how to treat more injuries and perform CPR!

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6. Football Injuries – Broken Bones

Don’t move the person except if necessary to avoid further injury. Take these actions immediately while waiting for medical help to arrive:

  • Stop any bleeding. Apply pressure to the wound with a sterile bandage, a clean cloth or a clean piece of clothing.
  • Immobilize the injured area. Don’t try to realign the bone or push a bone that’s sticking out back in.
  • Apply ice packs to limit swelling and help relieve pain until emergency personnel arrive. Don’t apply ice directly to the skin — wrap the ice in a towel, piece of cloth or some other material.
  • Treat for shock. If the person feels faint or is breathing in short, rapid breaths, lay the person down with the head slightly lower than the trunk and, if possible, elevate the legs.

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5. Football Injuries – Bloody Noses

  • Sit upright and lean forward. Sitting forward will help you avoid swallowing blood, which can irritate your stomach.
  • Pinch your nose. Use your thumb and index finger to pinch your nostrils shut. Breathe through your mouth. Continue to pinch for five to 10 minutes.
  • To prevent re-bleeding, don’t pick or blow your nose and don’t bend down for several hours after the bleeding episode.

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4. Cooking Injuries – Minor Burns

For minor burns, including first-degree burns and second-degree burns limited to an area no larger than 3 inches in diameter, take the following action:

  • Cool the burn. Hold the burned area under cool (not cold) running water for 10 or 15 minutes or until the pain subsides. Don’t put ice on the burn.
  • Cover the burn with a sterile gauze bandage. Don’t use fluffy cotton, or other material that may get lint in the wound. Wrap the gauze loosely to avoid putting pressure on burned skin.

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3. Cooking Injuries – Knife Wounds

Minor cuts and scrapes usually don’t require a trip to the emergency room. These guidelines can help you care for such wounds:

  1. Wash your hands. This helps avoid infection.
  2. Stop the bleeding. Minor cuts and scrapes usually stop bleeding on their own. If not, apply gentle pressure with a sterile bandage or clean cloth and elevate the wound.
  3. Clean the wound. Use clear water to rinse the wound. Also clean around the wound with soap and a clean cloth. Keep soap out of the wound, as it can cause irritation.
  4. Apply an antibiotic. Apply a thin layer of an antibiotic cream or ointment (Neosporin, Polysporin) to help keep the surface moist.
  5. Cover the wound. Bandages can help keep the wound clean and keep harmful bacteria out. If the injury is just a minor scrape, or scratch, leave it uncovered.
  6. Change the dressing. Do this at least once a day or whenever the bandage becomes wet or dirty.
  7. Get stitches for deep wounds. A deep — all the way through the skin — gaping or jagged wound with exposed fat or muscle will need stitches. If you can’t easily close the wound, see your doctor as soon as possible.

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2. Heart Attacks

Someone having a heart attack may experience any or all of the following:

  • Uncomfortable pressure, fullness or squeezing pain in the center of the chest
  • Prolonged pain in the upper abdomen
  • Discomfort or pain spreading beyond the chest to the shoulders, neck, jaw, teeth, or one or both arms
  • Shortness of breath
  • Lightheadedness, dizziness, fainting
  • Sweating
  • Nausea

If you or someone else may be having a heart attack

  • Call 911 or your local emergency medical assistance number.
  • Chew and swallow an aspirin, unless you’re allergic to aspirin or have been told by your doctor never to take aspirin. But seek emergency help first, such as calling 911.
  • Begin CPR if the person is unconscious. If you’re with a person who might be having a heart attack and he or she is unconscious, tell the 911 dispatcher or another emergency medical specialist. After calling 9-1-1 (retrieving an AED if available), and checking to see if the person responds, they show no signs of life for no more than 10 second, begin CPR immediately. You can learn how to do CPR by watching this instructional video: HERE

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1. Choking

The universal sign for choking is hands clutched to the throat. If the person doesn’t give the signal, look for these indications:

  • Inability to talk
  • Difficulty breathing or noisy breathing
  • Inability to cough forcefully
  • Skin, lips and nails turning blue or dusky
  • Loss of consciousness

If choking is occurring, begin abdominal thrusts:

  • Stand behind the person. Wrap your arms around the waist. Tip the person forward slightly.
  • Make a fist with one hand. Position it slightly above the person’s navel.
  • Grasp the fist with the other hand. Press hard into the abdomen with a quick, upward thrust — as if trying to lift the person up.
  • Perform a total of 5 abdominal thrusts, if needed. If the blockage still isn’t dislodged, repeat.

If you’re the only rescuer, perform abdominal thrusts before calling 911 or your local emergency number for help. If another person is available, have that person call for help while you perform first aid.

If the person becomes unconscious, perform standard CPR with chest compressions and rescue breaths.

To clear the airway of a pregnant woman or obese person:

  • Position your hands a little bit higher – at the base of the breastbone, just above the joining of the lowest ribs.
  • Proceed by pressing hard into the chest: with a quick thrust.
  • Repeat until the food or other blockage is dislodged or the person becomes unconscious.

To clear the airway of an unconscious person:

  • Lower the person on his or her back onto the floor.
  • Clear the airway. If a blockage is visible at the back of the throat or high in the throat, reach a finger into the mouth and sweep out the cause of the blockage. Be careful not to push the food or object deeper into the airway, which can happen easily in young children.
  • Begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if the object remains lodged and the person doesn’t respond after you take the above measures. The chest compressions used in CPR may dislodge the object. Remember to recheck the mouth periodically.

To clear the airway of a choking infant younger than age 1:

  • Assume a seated position and hold the infant facedown on your forearm, which is resting on your thigh.
  • Thump the infant gently but firmly five times on the back, in between the shoulder blades, using the heel of your hand. The combination of gravity and the back blows should release the blocking object.
  • Hold the infant face up on your forearm – with the head lower than the trunk if the above doesn’t work. Using two fingers placed at the center of the infant’s breastbone, give five quick chest compressions.
  • Repeat the back blows and chest thrusts if breathing doesn’t resume. Call for emergency medical help.
  • Begin infant CPR if the child loses consciousness or if one of these techniques opens the airway but the infant doesn’t resume breathing.

 

All resources can be found at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid